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Macross and The Descent of Man – aloe, dream

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Macross and The Descent of Man

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same species utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”
- Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Macross Zero

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

Macross Zero

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

Macross Zero

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

Macross Zero

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

Macross Zero

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

Excerpts from How human language could have evolved from birdsong, a joint study between researchers at MIT and University of Tokyo.

Categories: Meditation.

Tags: ,

Macross and The Descent of Man

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same species utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”
- Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Macross Zero

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

Macross Zero

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

Macross Zero

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

Macross Zero

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

Macross Zero

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

Excerpts from How human language could have evolved from birdsong, a joint study between researchers at MIT and University of Tokyo.

Categories: .

Macross: The Descent of Man

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same species utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”
- Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Macross Zero

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

Macross Zero

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

Macross Zero

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

Macross Zero

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

Macross Zero

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

Categories: .

Macross: The Descent of Man

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same species utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”
- Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Macross Zero

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

Macross Zero

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

Macross Zero

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

Macross Zero

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

Macross Zero

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

Categories: .

Macross: The Descent of Man

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same species utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”
- Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Macross Zero

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

Macross Zero

Five

Macross Zero

Six

Macross Zero

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

Macross Zero

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

 

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Categories: .

Song of Birds

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same spec
ies utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”

– Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

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Five

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Nine

between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression

old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions

birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

the researchers suggest that humans first had the ability to sing

Categories: .

Song of Birds

“The sounds uttered by birds offer in several respects the nearest analogy to language, for all the members of the same spec
ies utter the same instinctive cries expressive of their emotions; and all kinds which sing, exert their power instinctively…”

– Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man

Macross Zero

Two

Macross Zero

Three

Macross Zero

Four

Macross Zero

Five

Macross Zero

Six

Macross Zero

Seven

Macross Zero

Eight

Macross Zero

Nine

[...] between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago, humans may have merged these two types of expression [...]

Old structures can change just a little bit, and acquire radically new functions.

[...] birds sing learned melodies with what Berwick calls a “holistic” structure; the entire song has one meaning

a nightingale may be able to recite from 100 to 200 different melodies

like birds, we also have a melodic capacity and an ability to recombine parts of our uttered language

Categories: .

Song of Birds

Macross Zero

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Three

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Five

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Seven

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Macross Zero

Nine

Categories: .

Song of Birds

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Six

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Seven

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Nine

Categories: .

Song of Birds

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Categories: .

Song of Birds

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Nine

Categories: .

Song of Birds

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Macross Zero
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Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: Drama.

Tags:

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Square One

Nodame 06 - via Garten

“It is what a man thinks of himself that really determines his fate.”
- Henry David Thoreau

The sixth episode begins like a dream. This is where Nodame’s transformation truly begins. She has a sense of fleeting time and a realization that she cannot be alongside Chiaki in her current state, a realization brought on by Stresemann. In the same respect, Nodame can no longer be the mascot; the prelude is over. And we see how this is significant as the S-oke wills to disband.

Chiaki’s inspiration remains questionable. Through his self-concept we understand how his fate is still in tact: a desire to exercise his potential yet unable to leave Japan and follow his master. I find it fascinating how Chiaki slipped astutely back into his world. He acknowledges this very idea at the bar, and we even have Saiko willfully appearinig at his apartment. Yet somewhere inside is perspective and a sense of pride in the power of the most curious musicians, the S-oke.

As the motivating force, Kiyora’s talents extend beyond music. Her wish to establish a pro-am orchestra brings clarity to the atmosphere and revitalizes Chiaki. Only Kiyora, the concertmaster, is able to shift Chiaki. Mine and Nodame both lack the artistic poise to influence him despite sharing recent experiences. But all three – Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki – undoubtedly feel the impact left by Stresemann.

Afterthought

Her name, Miki Kiyora (三木 清良), offers an interesting point in the episode. Pure, skilled… Her ability to inspire Chiaki is reasonable. While 三木 (本 counter aside) is debatable. Mine, Nodame, and Chiaki could be a trio, but Kikuchi, Kuroki, and Chiaki could also be mi-ki… I find this poetic in a way.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Wings

Nodame is the only person in Chiaki’s life who can both 1-up and 1-down him at the same time.

Nodame Cantabile’s sixth episode is more or less transitional for both Chiaki and Nodame.

Transitional but very crucial.

Two points of interest:

The first important scene occurs when Chiaki brings Nodame to the piano room in order to hear her play Rachmaninoff, with his accompaniment. Without either of them knowing it, their playing sets Nodame’s fate in motion, as Eto by chance observed this mock duet. More directly Nodame’s playing has an effect on Chiaki, further pushing him to question what he intends to do in Japan. Chiaki feels that a forward step may be in mentoring Nodame, even a small amount. But this care leads him to reflect on himself more than anything, as he insistently questions Nodame intention as a pianist. He realizes this question contrasts those who have asked what he intends to do by remaining in Japan.

Chiaki’s path becomes clear after he is ambushed by an elite tiger, Miki Kiyora, who brings a proposition to the table. Where Mine had failed to persuade Chiaki to continue the S-oke, Kiyora succeeds with the prowess of her status and social demeanor. Even Mine, playing “man on the grassy knoll,” is surprised at how quickly Chiaki accepts. Though Chiaki’s response was grey, Kiyora reassures him with her vision of what kind of oke he could amass given his recent popularity with brilliant young talent across the country. There is some name-dropping, small excitement, and the deal is done.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty character dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: Drama.

Tags:

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty character dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads (2012), starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy for youth and naivety.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads, starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy shall be known.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads, starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy shall be known.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive female characters. But I think it is necessary to highlight a new face, even if the context is a live-action series. Amy Sherman-Palladino’s (Gilmore Girls) latest story, Bunheads, starts as a catty affair and soon reveals a mean streak in the darling Sasha (above).

Witty characters dynamics, on-screen ballet and dance, a quirky town, familiar music, Michelle’s dream-sequences, distinct cattiness, costumes, the vague realm between adolescence and adulthood… The writing is charged with attractive elements. Yet the mean girl has such significance, perfectly fine in her retaliation but not beyond hope. A hope for courage, a moment to blossom; my sympathy shall be known.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive, feminine characters.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive, feminine characters.

Categories: .

Sympathy for a Mean Girl

Sasha

This isn’t the time or place to further express what I love about cruel or destructive, feminine characters.

Categories: .

Auto Draft

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Our time together is a secret that will forever bring me joy. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my everyday life. From this point forward, I may not return.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: Diary, Weekly.

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my everyday life. From this point forward, I may not return.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my everyday life. From this point forward, I may not return.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my life. From this point forward, I may not return here.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my life. From this point forward, I may not return here.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my life. From this point forward, I may not return here.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my life. From this point forward, I may not return here.

May we all look forward to another dream.

Categories: .

light

As the year ends, I am deeply saddened by the loss of my grandfather, my best friend, only a few days ago. I have everything I need in memories. Yet I must learn to live without this integral part of my life. From this point forward, I may not return here.

May we all look forward to another dream in the coming year.

Categories: .

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fdsfds

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light

The year is almost over, such an incredible year.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

“We do not remember days; we remember moments.”Cesare Pavese

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness and moves like an ocean tide.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

Though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon the time and texture of reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: Weekly.

Tags: ,

Nostalgia Cloud

“We do not remember days; we remember moments.”Cesare Pavese

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness and moves like an ocean tide.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

Though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon the time and texture of reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

“We do not remember days; we remember moments.” – Cesare Pavese

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness and moves like an ocean tide.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

Though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon the time and texture of reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness and moves like an ocean tide.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

Though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon the time and texture of reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness and moves like an ocean tide.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

Though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon the time and texture of reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

…sometimes the heart remembers what the mind has long forgotten.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time before and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness as it comes and goes.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

And though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon time and textured reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time b
efore and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness as it comes and goes.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

And though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon time and textured reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time b
efore and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resonates with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness as it comes and goes.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

And though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon time and textured reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Nostalgia Cloud

A delightful and dangerous tiger recently wrote about favorites and their persistence through life. With this notion, I immediately recalled School Rumble, a favorite I’ve not been able to shake for many years, and how my experience with favorites is drowned in nostalgic context. Rather than mechanically entertaining my current circumstance, favorites often allude to a time b
efore and my presence in a distant memory.

Truthfully, Nodame Cantabile (drama) has greater merit in the realm of favorites. I have watched the drama on numerous occasions, thick and thin, and I am returned to the closing months of 2006 each time. These were beautiful university days – leisurely, festive, off-the-record – and soon-to-be fleeting, in a certain sense. Nodame Cantabile was not alone in my weekly followings, and that is peculiar. What attribute of this drama allowed a personal fondness above the rest?

I would suggest resonance, an amplication of enjoyment between reality and fiction. Nodame Cantabile resontes with me still, but the feeling was then so pristine. It was the right time. And I was able to feel the characters and story integrated with life’s magic, the whimsical magic which leaves a residue of happiness as it comes and goes.

My abstraction, framed by resonace and timing, is undoubtedly vauge and quite possibly the pink lemonade of a lunatic’s wisdom. But listen: nostalgia, while clouding judgement, is not what creates favorites. Instead, I believe that duty rests on contextual elements of today, those with nostalgic potential, and their coalescence with the fiction we experience at present. This makes sense to a fool like me.

And though a romantic, I do not find myself actively living in the past; life should never allow such folly. No, I am desperately aware that moments of elation, built upon time and textured reality, are irreplaceable at best… and forgotten at worst.

Categories: .

Favorites Dipped in Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Categories: .

Favorites Dipped in Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Categories: .

Favorites Dipped in Nostalgia

Nostalgia

Categories: .

Derailing Fate in Proposal Daisakusen

Proposal Daisakusen

Proposal Daisakusen is a 2007 drama I sometimes find myself rewatching, usually for clean, enjoyable entertainment. The story is about Ken Iwase (Tomohisa Yamashita) and his regret in being unable to properly secure a relationship with childhood friend, Rei Yoshida (Masami Nagasawa). I have previously mentioned the premise is fairly unimaginative, but the drama’s strengths lie in the attention to details and a good execution of various genre.

An important mechanic of the story features Ken slipping through time in order to remedy his lack of romantic effort towards Rei in the past. But this element turns out to be more fantasy-based than science-fiction, placing it closer to the 2004 film, Be With You (いま、会いにゆきます, Ima Ai ni Yukimasu). Though dissimilar to Be With You, where the time slip is the fate of Takumi’s family, a mobius in Mio’s life, Proposal takes a naive approach exemplifying the futility of tampering with the past.

Ken’s episodic slips are the story’s primary means of exposition and follow a simple set of rules, which intends to minimize the audience’s speculative efforts. Each episode brings Ken back through a photograph, and in that way, the story proceeds from past to present but always originating in the present. While some viewers may have desired more details on the fairy’s magic, I believe time-travel is a trapping of fiction where many stories lose focal balance. That is to say, time-travel is highly captivating in culture, an easy grab at attention, but must be used wisely.

In that sense, Proposal nearly subverts the element of time-travel because the mechanics are dealt with in a fabulously frivolous manner involving a fairy (yousei) and focuses purely on the consequence (or not) of changing an impression in the past. I find this contrary to the typical usage of time-travel, steeped in egoism, where a character’s variance in the past has a profound effect on the present. And this story explores sliding as a triviality in light of fate.

The story teaches us that fate is difficult to derail even when assuming an advantage in time. Such fate is not fragile nor delicate, but unwavering, momentous. Yes, fate carries such momentum as it advances and plays trickery on the fool who looks back in regret, thinking “if only.” Returning from the final slip, Ken realizes that his advantage over fate was a mere illusion. To have lived each moment twice and failing all the same, he is left with a greater finality to his sorrow.

We come to understand that fate is often unchangeable in retrospect, yet there is more to the story. Ken ultimately decides his fate in the present, and I feel it’s an important highlight of the message. Despite a longing to manipulating the past, our greatest leverage over the future exists in the present.

Categories: Drama.

Tags:

Derailing Fate in Proposal Daisakusen

Proposal Daisakusen

Proposal Daisakusen is a 2007 drama I sometimes find myself rewatching, usually for clean, enjoyable entertainment. The story is about Ken Iwase (Tomohisa Yamashita) and his regret in being unable to properly secure a relationship with childhood friend, Rei Yoshida (Masami Nagasawa). I have previously mentioned the premise is fairly unimaginative, but the drama’s strengths lie in the attention to details and a good execution of various genre.

An important mechanic of the story features Ken slipping through time in order to remedy his lack of romantic effort towards Rei in the past. But this element turns out to be more fantasy-based than science-fiction, placing it closer to the 2004 film, Be With You (いま、会いにゆきます, Ima Ai ni Yukimasu). Though dissimilar to Be With You, where the time slip is the fate of Takumi’s family, a mobius in Mio’s life, Proposal takes a naive approach exemplifying the futility of tampering with the past.

Ken’s episodic slips are the story’s primary means of exposition and follow a simple set of rules, which intends to minimize the audience’s speculative efforts. Each episode brings Ken back through a photograph, and in that way, the story proceeds from past to present but always originating in the present. While some viewers may have desired more details on the fairy’s magic, I believe time-travel is a trapping of fiction where many stories lose focal balance. That is to say, time-travel is highly captivating in culture, an easy grab at attention, but must be used wisely.

In that sense, Proposal nearly subverts the element of time-travel because the mechanics are dealt with in a fabulously frivolous manner involving a fairy (yousei) and focuses purely on the consequence (or not) of changing an impression in the past. I find this contrary to the typical usage of time-travel, steeped in egoism, where a character’s variance in the past has a profound effect on the present. And this story explores sliding as a triviality in light of fate.

The story teaches us that fate is difficult to derail even when assuming an advantage in time. Such fate is not fragile nor delicate, but unwavering, momentous. Yes, fate carries such momentum as it advances and plays trickery on the fool who looks back in regret, thinking “if only.” Returning from the final slip, Ken realizes that his advantage over fate was a mere illusion. To have lived each moment twice and failing all the same, he is left with a greater finality to his sorrow.

We come to understand that fate is often unchangeable in retrospect, yet there is more to the story. Ken ultimately decides his fate in the present, and I feel it’s an important highlight of the message. Despite a longing to manipulating the past, our greatest leverage over the future exists in the present.

Categories: .

Reflection on Blogs

carnival

Among the numerous blogs I subscribe to, the ones I like to read offer greater intrigue than irritation, especially through an author’s identity, where taste and subtlety of expression are of divine worth. I play favorites to those whom I have a greater personal knowledge, respect, or simple fascination of. Naturally, my society dwindles in this age of blogging.

A sharing sphere led to discovery once upon a time, and now, stumbling across a new blog is a rarity of events. Yet I allow two points of decision to guide my initial captivation with a blog: author and aesthetic. A single entry is my typical requirement in reading an author for personality, prose, and depth of content. Aesthetic sensibilities are immediately noticed upon visiting a site, and I am far more critical of post layout than overall theme.

On this note, a good blog should be presentable and must have an author of promising mind. Balance between concision, elegance, and depth is drawn from fundamental prerequisites. No want for minds inversely refined, for behaviors of annoyance are simply surmised: needless.

Categories: Review.

Reflection on Blogs

carnival

Among the numerous blogs I subscribe to, the ones I like to read offer greater intrigue than irritation, especially through an author’s identity, where taste and subtlety of expression are of divine worth. I play favorites to those whom I have a greater personal knowledge, respect, or simple fascination of. Naturally, my society dwindles in this age of blogging.

A sharing sphere led to discovery once upon a time, and now, stumbling across a new blog is a rarity of events. Yet I allow two points of decision to guide my initial captivation with a blog: author and aesthetic. A single entry is my typical requirement in reading an author for personality, prose, and depth of content. Aesthetic sensibilities are immediately noticed upon visiting a site, and I am far more critical of post layout than overall theme.

On this note, a good blog should be presentable and must have an author of promising mind. Balance between concision, elegance, and depth is drawn from fundamental prerequisites. No want for minds inversely refined, for behaviors of annoyance are simply surmised: needless.

Categories: .

Reflection on Blogs

carnival

Among the numerous blogs I subscribe to, the ones I like to read offer greater intrigue than irritation, especially through an author’s identity, where taste and subtlety of expression are of divine worth. I play favorites to those whom I have a greater personal knowledge, respect, or simple fascination of. Naturally, my society dwindles in this age of blogging.

A sharing sphere led to discovery once upon a time, and now, stumbling across a new blog is a rarity of events. Yet I allow two points of decision to guide my initial captivation with a blog: author and aesthetic. A single entry is my typical requirement in reading an author for personality, prose, and depth of content. Aesthetic sensibilities are immediately noticed upon visiting a site, and I am far more critical of post layout than overall theme.

On this note, a good blog should be presentable and must have an author of promising mind. Balance between concision, elegance, and depth is drawn from fundamental prerequisites. No want for minds inversely refined, for behaviors of annoyance are simply be surmised: needless.

Categories: .

Reflections on Blogs

carnival

Among the numerous blogs I subscribe to, the ones I like to read offer greater intrigue than irritation, especially through the writer’s identity, where taste and subtlety of expression are of divine worth. I play favorites to those whom I have a greater personal knowledge, respect, or simple fascination of. Naturally, my society dwindles in this age of blogging.

A sharing sphere led to discovery once upon a time, and now, stumbling across a new blog is a rarity of events. Yet I allow three points of decision to guide my initial captivation with a blog: author and aesthetic. A single entry is my typical requirement in reading an author for personality, prose, and depth of content. Aesthetic sensibilities are immediately noticed upon visiting a site, and I am far more critical of post layout than overall theme.

Categories: .

Reflections on Blogs

carnival

Categories: .

Reflections on Blogs

carnival

Categories: .

Reflections on Blogs

carnival

I was pinged by FoxyLadyAyame in a carnival to which I find easily approximated in few

Categories: .

SnippetTee on Tari Tari’s Architecture

It was an interesting post, and my thoughts…

In the midst of reading up on Tari Tari, though I’ve yet to watch and may not watch. I would have enjoyed mention of how the architecture bridges contemporary and traditional architecture motifs in the Japanese style. The use of wood is clearly traditional, while glass and metal yield modern aesthetic. From the second image, a mild Victorian presence can be seen in the south/west building, which is an interesting contrast between the two campus buildings. I do wonder what the characters were discussing in these frames. Also of interest is the gymnasium, which, with the double gable structure and angled supports/columns, appears as a modern take, streamlined, version of the traditional Mediterranean temple.

Alas, these things were not discussed.

Categories: Comment.

SnippetTee on Tari Tari’s Architecture

It was an interesting post, and my thoughts…

In the midst of reading up on Tari Tari, though I’ve yet to watch and may not watch. I would have enjoyed mention of how the architecture bridges contemporary and traditional architecture motifs in the Japanese style. The use of wood is clearly traditional, while glass and metal yield modern aesthetic. From the second image, a mild Victorian presence can be seen in the south/west building, which is an interesting contrast between the two campus buildings. I do wonder what the characters were discussing in these frames. Also of interest is the gymnasium, which, with the double gable structure and angled supports/columns, appears as a modern take, streamlined, version of the traditional Mediterranean temple.

Alas, these things were not discussed.

Categories: .

SnippetTee on Tari Tari’s Architecture

It was an interesting post, and my thoughts…

In the midst of reading up on Tari Tari, though I’ve yet to watch and may not watch. I would have enjoyed mention of how the architecture bridges contemporary and traditional architecture motifs in the Japanese style. The use of wood is clearly traditional, while glass and metal yield modern aesthetic. From the second image, a mild Victorian presence can be seen in the south/west building, which is an interesting contrast between the two campus buildings. I do wonder what the characters were discussing in these frames. Also of interest is the gymnasium, which, with the double gable structure and angled supports/columns, appears as a modern take, streamlined, version of the traditional Mediterranean temple.

Alas, these things were not discussed.

Categories: .

SnippetTee on Tari Tari’s Architecture

It was an interesting post, and my thoughts…

In the midst of reading up on Tari Tari, though I’ve yet to watch and may not watch. I would have enjoyed mention of how the architecture bridges contemporary and traditional architecture motifs in the Japanese style. The use of wood is clearly traditional, while glass and metal yield modern aesthetic. From the second image, a mild Victorian presence can be seen in the south/west building, which is an interesting contrast between the two campus buildings. I do wonder what the characters were discussing in these frames. Also of interest is the gymnasium, which, with the double gable structure and angled supports/columns, appears as a modern take, streamlined, version of the traditional Mediterranean temple.

Alas, these things were not discussed.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: Meditation.

Tags: , , ,

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in definition of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the realm of framing nudity is vast; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite [1].

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, brings richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focus on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Notes

[1] – Leave room for fetish, which will forever be a variable in audience preference.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured gender orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, enables a richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focusing on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko to discuss well-developed characters coexisting with unobtrusive sexual themes.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured gender orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes. One could argue that Motoko, as a character, enables a richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focusing on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

In the next post, I hope to move past Motoko and Ghost in the Shell to discuss varied characterizations

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured gender orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes.

One could argue that Motoko, as a character, enables a richness in perspective throughout the story above other fictional elements. But focusing on beauty and utility of the physical being, as understood [or discovered] by the character, creates a fascinating conversation on sex, gender, and when skillfully incorporated, nudity.

 

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, Motoko approaches identity from a novel origin, independent of nurtured gender orientation. I feel pure existentialism carries a greater immediacy in GitS and would further the argument beyond feminine identity, but the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects raising the complexity of themes.

One could argue that Motoko, as a character, enables a richness in perspective throughout the story, above other fictional elements. But for our purposes,

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the existential facade of sex and gender as an opponent of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

As a character free from the usual social stigma of gender,  . I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in GitS. But the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables a richness in perspective throughout the story, above world-building or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended in Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself.

With Motoko’s femininity highlighted as a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, . I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in GitS. But the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables a richness in perspective throughout the story, above world-building or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms:

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

With Motoko’s femininity highlighted as a character free from the usual social stigma of gender, she is poised to. I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in GitS. But the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables a richness in perspective throughout the story, above world-building or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in GitS. But the story is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables a richness in perspective throughout the story, above world-building or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender):

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms, and Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

This is extended by Machinations of Gender Dualisms,

Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.1

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite1.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity and nonchalance towards her body’s aesthetic, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is [not] human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity conducive to reinforcing the perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human, or are we forced into duality? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell) is thought of as purposeful. Given, I was unable to finish reading the post on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s nudity (Ghost in the Shell)

Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of imagination in visual fiction unable to liberate femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion in Defending Ecchi, where Motoko’s (Ghost in the Shell) nudity is shown outside the .

Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime that liberates femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And I feel this is harmonious with discussion of ecchi in Defending Eand a specific character shown in the nude

Another

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And this is harmonious with a passively encounters thoughts on

Another

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited in the medium and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target demographics being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica. And this is harmonious with a encountered in

Another

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman, and is her nudity meant reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on the female form in noting that disclosure of the body is limited and less appealing than sensual suggestion. The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and blatant objectification.

Lines of Temptation reflects on
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice and 

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse. Reading these posts, I realized that character has great command over an audience’s assimilation of sex, gender, and nudity. And in the media of visual fiction, it is often a lack of good characterization leading to the doldrums of generic fanservice.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

In “defending ecchi”

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless erotica.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

 

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi or erotica. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, illuminate similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, drawn similar lines of discourse. Or preferably,

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, drawn similar lines of discourse. Or preferably,

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience often satisfied by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, drawn similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively, and perhaps unintentionally, drawn similar lines of discourse.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I find myself interested in a small trend of nudity and gender topics among recent posts which collectively

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

I was quite interested in noticing a small trend based on nudity and gender among recent posts that

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

gene

Having noticed a small trend based on nudity and gender, I was quite interested

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena

Having noticed a small trend based on nudity and gender, I was quite interested

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel carries a greater immediacy in Motoko’s characterization. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena

Having noticed a small trend in recent posts

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi. Despite this, in the midst of one idea, another surfaces:

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Concision aside, “a triviality of the thematic setting” is an understatement of Motoko’s nudity in my opinion. Does the audience perceive Motoko as a woman? Does her nudity reinforce this perception? Can we acknowledge Motoko is not human? What is the facade of sex and gender in light of technology? Her body, triviality or not, stimulates thought and dissonance as we realize the state of the character. But more importantly, the character offers a severe context for nudity, discouraging the typical sexual appetite.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

There We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Gender, Nudity, and the Power of Characterization

Disclaimer: this is not about Utena… yet.

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

 

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender).

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

I would further this argument beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, which I feel is primary. But GitS is intricately textured with other fascinating aspects as well, adding complexity to the palette of theme. And one could argue that Motoko enables the story such variance in perspective, instead of the world or premise.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as a feminine existence without a ‘female’ mindset, as a social trapping (gender). I would further this argument extends beyond feminine identity into the realm of gender-free existentialism, but GitS

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

 

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

We take serious perception of Motoko’s bare body because of the character, not because of plot contrivances.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as an existence without ‘feminine’

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as an existence without ‘feminine’

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity with sincerity. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide context for baseless nudity.

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/
Thoughts: Motoko as an existence without ‘feminine’

The loss of the mindset of being ‘female’, is actually what allows Motoko to undertake a genuine exploration of herself. This lends her more credibility as a strong, intellectual and attractive woman, than any amount of femme-fatality.

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/
Thoughts: I was unable to finish reading this article on the premise that ecchi and fanservice may denote equivalence but the imagination of framing nudity is a vast realm; nudity does not imply ecchi.

Is it tasteless ecchi in Ghost in the Shell when Motoko is shown nude? Was it put there just to excite the audience? I would argue no. In the world Motoko lives in, she is a genderless cyborg struggling to find her identity as a person where personal identities seem sparse and meaningless. Devoid of femininity yet having a seemingly perfect feminine body, traditional themes of femininity and post-modern gender neutrality clash. Her body isn’t to titillate, it’s just a triviality of the thematic setting.

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/
Thoughts: The constructs of modern anime prove difficult in showing nudity, perhaps in lieu of the target audience in being incapable of observing nudity in a serious context. The veil of ‘dress’ provides the necessary mystery to entice an audience but often by shallow mechanics.

There is a lack of ‘vision’ in anime, which liberates the femininity from objective chains, but I believe the fundamental nature of this problem is in the defining of character and a reliance on narrative to provide

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

The Machinations of Gender Dualisms
http://listlessink.wordpress.com/2012/06/10/the-machinations-of-gender-dualisms/

On Nudity and Profundity: Defending Ecchi and Ambivalence
http://snippettee.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/on-nudity-and-profundity-defending-ecchi-and-ambivalence/

Lines of Temptation
http://akirascuro.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/lines-of-temptation/

Categories: .

Thoughts on Nudity

You can’t actually show sexual intercourse on anime. So, the only time we really get to see titties is in the changing rooms or in the bathtub. It’s generally pretty hard to work that into the narrative of the show, and often times, people don’t even try. Hence, the hot spring episode.

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 1950s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look more* innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.


Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese otaku culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely. Call it speculation…

Update: needing to clarify that by “Japanese culture” the context was “Japanese otaku culture” which has fetishized lolita, thus lolicon (as touched on in the original post). This responses is not a comment on the intent of wearers of Lolita style whom have good reason to not attach promiscuous connotation to their manner of dress. And to somewhat clarify my final speculation that from a street style to a fetishized aesthetic in Japanese visual fiction, Lolita style has plausible sexuality on the street, when intended.

I appreciate Aelysium’s response.

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 1950s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look more* innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.


Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese otaku culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely. Call it speculation…

Update: needing to clarify that by “Japanese culture” the context was “Japanese otaku culture” which has fetishized lolita, thus lolicon (as touched on in the original post). This responses is not a comment on the intent of wearers of Lolita style whom have good reason to not attach promiscuous connotation to their manner of dress. And to somewhat clarify my final speculation that from a street style to a fetishized aesthetic in Japanese visual fiction, Lolita style has plausible sexuality on the street, when intended.

I appreciate Aelysium’s response to this.

Categories: .

Auto Draft

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 1950s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look more* innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.


Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese otaku culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely. Call it speculation…

Update: needing to clarify that by “Japanese culture” the context was “Japanese otaku culture” which has fetishized lolita, thus lolicon (as touched on in the original post). This responses is not a comment on the intent of wearers of Lolita style whom have good reason to not attach promiscuous connotation to their manner of dress. And to somewhat clarify my final speculation that from a street style to a fetishized aesthetic in Japanese visual fiction, Lolita style now has plausible sexuality on the street, when intended.

I appreciate Aelysium’s response.

Categories: Comment.

Tags: ,

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 1950s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely. Call it speculation…

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 1950s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely. Call it speculation…

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity of youth. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But perhaps they are one in the same; the sexual vitality of [post] pubescent youth with hormones firing in every direction and the encapsulation of purity dressed to mask this inner vitality. It is hard to imagine a culture versed in aesthetic beauty and sexual symbolism would blatantly ignore one or the other entirely.

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of lolita sexuality has become a fetish of youth and innocence. Arguably, “lolita” is not a misnomer when viewed this way.

But I feel there is an area of grey, where the fetish is an expression of desire to dominate, perhaps solely on the basis of ‘mature’ advantage. And for many men incapable of sexually dominating the full prowess of Woman, lolita is the escape – that the inexperience of Girl, a purity, is easier to taint.

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of feminine sexuality has been fetishized.

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

[...] hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. I can only partially agree with Aelysium when considering the traditional notion on lolita: seductiveness, attractiveness, and sexual promiscuity. As an aesthetic movement, lolita style exhibits a good side, quite harmless. But I feel the sexuality of lolita, instead removal, has undergone a dark transformation in Japanese culture in which the common allure of feminine sexuality has been fetishized

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

A fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Regardless of overlooked mechanisms which drove Victorian style, particularly, into the Japanese lolita scene, this point is perplexing. Considering

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

It’s a fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Considering

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

It’s a fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Considering

Categories: .

Aelysium on Lolita

lolita

It’s a fair post, though I feel there is a failure to address deeper roots of lolita, such as the 50s novel, Lolita. But here’s a point of interest:

hence why often lolita style tends to make girls look less innocent, younger and generally less ‘womanly’.

Considering

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, jaded with young emotions, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

She holds an air of doubt when wishing upon the rock, and this shows her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality and forgone dreams. I believe her need to play the Devil’s advocate enables quarreling among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. And when tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, she becomes pointed at Natsumi’s “unrealistic” goal. Jumping from the bed, I feel Saki is further amusing in that she remains willing to test life’s magic even if she has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single role color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: Meditation, Spring.

Tags: , ,

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, jaded with young emotions, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

She holds an air of doubt when wishing upon the rock, and this shows her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality and forgone dreams. I believe her need to play the Devil’s advocate enables quarreling among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. And when tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, she becomes pointed at Natsumi’s “unrealistic” goal. Jumping from the bed, I feel Saki is further amusing in that she remains willing to test life’s magic even if she has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single role color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, jaded with young emotions, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

She holds an air of doubt when wishing upon the rock, and this shows her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality and forgone dreams. I believe her need to play the Devil’s advocate enables quarreling among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. And when tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, she becomes pointed at Natsumi’s “unrealistic” goal. Jumping from the bed, I feel Saki is further amusing in that she remains willing to test life’s magic even if she has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single role color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

She holds an air of doubt in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this shows her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality and forgone dreams. I believe her need to play the Devil’s advocate enables quarreling among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. And when tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, she becomes pointed at Natsumi’s “unrealistic” goal. Jumping from the bed, I feel Saki is further amusing in that she remains willing to test life’s magic. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends revealing precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful in mixed hues. And no matter how well-written, these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin think in the clouds, Rin and Natsumi share homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki, in my opinion, ready an independence poised for sexuality. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised for sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Natsuiro Kiseki
Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

Natsuiro Kiseki

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Natsuiro Kiseki

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised for sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Natsuiro Kiseki

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised for sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] – Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close [1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised for sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.
[2] Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a short history of beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close[1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends while internally concerned with life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

But beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition, the characters break a conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have homely bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised for sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their delightful friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Texture of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close[1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and internally concerned over life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we can understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Either way, the friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki is delightful.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Natsuiro Kiseki and the Colorful Friction of Friendship

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close[1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and internally concerned over life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we can understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Either way, the friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki is delightful.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Hues of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways yet intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. I raised the point that Hanasaku Iroha may exemplify the kind of frictionship immediately prominent in Natsuiro, but I feel there is more to the texture of friendship which grants Natsuiro Kiseki an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect, with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Cold, uncaring, and mean; there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s cold-cat attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends that reveals precisely how they are close[1]. Yet Saki happens to be the off element. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her curious actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and internally concerned over life’s convention. Her expressions show a dissatisfaction with the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a mundane, changing life she seems to have little control over, and it manifests in a naive attempt at burning bridges. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important stage. But there is more to Saki beyond her angry pubescent potions: light cynicism.

We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of reality. I believe this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, enables her to quarrel among friends she sees as lofty or unrealistic. As tennis nationals becomes an unattainable dream in Saki’s reality, Natsumi’s goal becomes unrealistic. I feel Saki is further amusing in that she wishes life could be magical, she wishes tennis nationals were her reality, but has lost the motivation to consider possibility. She is easy to read in this way and quite charming in her tender complexities.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If we notice distinct roles in the friendships of Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then by comparison we should see how the girls of Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators to an extent. Natsumi and Saki are sporty, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual bonds with their mothers, while Yuka and Saki are, in my opinion, poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brings a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through mixed hues. And Saki may be the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for their intricate friendship to be attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary, and we can understand that each carry a selfish wish [2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by multifarious desires differing from our own? The power of the wishing rock allows us to believe wishes earnestly shared together shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding which wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful or fall apart.

Either way, the friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki is delightful.

Notes

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those extremely close, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] Or a book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Conventional Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Conventional Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Breaking Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Unconventional Friendship of Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

The Unconventional Friendship

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted. Thus the true magic is not only having wishes granted but understanding what wishes are truly shared between friends. And in that light, how their friendship can remain fruitful.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

Finally, I should mention how the girls are unsettled as a group. We may understand this simply from the opening cat fight, or see that each girl is characterized with her own life circumstances. Interests, responsibilities, problems, and relationships vary by character, and we can understand that each has their own distinct wishes[2]. How well can we realize life’s magic when surrounded by those whose desires differ from our own? This is the power of the wishing rock in allowing us to believe that if they earnestly share a wish together it shall be granted.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

[2] or book of wishes in the case of Yuka.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character thus far, but these characters need not be Faye Valentine for us to find the reality of their friendship attractive.

 

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

Beyond Saki and the chemistry of opposition is that the characters break the conventional balance of cliche circles. If by comparison we notice distinct characters in works such as Lucky Star, K-ON!, and arguably Manabi Straight, then similarly we shouljd see how the girls in Natsuiro have overlapping attributes. Yuka, Rin, Saki, and Natsumi are all instigators in some sense. Natsumi and Saki are sporting, Yuka and Rin have lofty tendencies, Rin and Natsumi have casual relationships with their mothers, and Yuka and Saki are poised towards sexual awareness. The beauty is not that each character brigns a single color to the palette, but the palette they create together is colorful through blending hues. Saki is the only well-written character

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

 

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life could be magical more than anyone else. I finid her easy to read in this way and quite charming in her small complexities of tender youth.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards the extraordinary, a sad embrace of realism. I believe it is this force in her character, perhaps a need to play the Devil’s advocate, which allows her to quarrel among friends who she may see as lofty (lord knows that Yuka is lofty). What’s further amusing about Saki is that despite her personality, I believe she wishes life was magical.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards extraordinary events.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the present, and we see how she redirects the internal struggle to those around her. She is largely saying, “Fuck it!” to a changing life she seems to have little control over, which manifests in a naive attempt to end the friendship on a bad note. These are moves of an inexperienced rebel on the verge of an important time in life.

But there is more to Saki found in light cynicism beyond beyond her angry pubescent potions. We witnessed her doubtful demeanor in a flashback to the first wish upon the rock, and this perplexing doubt allows a view at her cynicism towards extraordinary events.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented, possessing emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention. Her expressions let in at her dissatisfaction in the way things are

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them is common for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. I find her discontented with the emotions of of a growing girl, and more important than the presence of her actions are the motives behind them.

Giving Saki special attention yields two-faced detail: mean-spirited towards her best friends and an internal concern over life’s convention.

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Breaking the Conventions of Friendship in Natsuiro Kiseki

Natsuiro Kiseki is a Spring series I shortlisted in winter but managed to slide under my self-limited radar. Thankfully, a few bloggers have given the show traction and a positive attention I was drawn to. Natsuiro is a standard affair in many ways but intriguing for it’s approach to friendship, a topic Akirascuro wrote about in observation. As I commented, the kind of conflictship seen in Natsuiro is best represented in Hanasaku Iroha. And though the friendly tension is immediately noticeable, I feel there is more to the texture which grants the story an appealing stay with the audience.

Saki is, of course, the first impressive aspect with the conflict between her and Natsumi being featured from the start. Mean, cold, or uncaring, there was a mess of discussion about this character and her personality. But I feel she is more than a cold cat. Upon reexamining the first episode, I realized that Natsumi and Saki have a history of little beef. Fighting between them isn’t uncommon for reasons I cannot pin solely on Saki’s attitude; it’s chemistry. There is a friction between these friends and that is precisely how they are close[1]. Yet the atypical element is Saki. And I find her distressed, sad,

 

[1] – In my experience, it is more difficult to fight with people we don’t care about and easier to butt heads with those really close to us, we’re comfortable like that.

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: .

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: Drama.

Tags:

Nodame Cantabile: Bloom

Nodame 05

“Into each life some rain must fall, some days must be dark and dreary.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A rainy day is a good place to start this episode. Water is so fundamental yet powerful with regards to life. “April showers, bring May flowers,” but in more traditional contexts, water is related to emotive forces and feeling. One of my early attractions to Japanese culture was the idealistic relationship and integration with nature, and Nodame Cantabile showcases a healthy amount of the natural world throughout. I do not mean to insist the story is ripe with natural symbolism outside it’s convenient placement, but rain feeds the flowers and the flowers hope to bloom. Similarly, Milch stirs emotions this episode which will enable Chiaki to discover more within his cold, mechanical self.

Nodame 05

Milch’s challenge to Chiaki occurs in a few different forms. First, Milch attempts to rebuild bonds with the S-Oke as if he had not wronged them. His shifty ways raise question to his authenticity among Chiaki and Mine, but Chiaki believes Milch to be Strezemann. Chiaki’s confidence in Milch is so eager to grow but immediately stunted when Elise appears and intends to bring Milch back to Europe.

Without a mentor, Chiaki must again question his position or his identity, a thought I like to entertain. He cannot become a conductor as his circumstance becomes more uncertain. Milch challenges Chiaki by returning only to have him play a concerto under the maestro.

“You are a student from the Piano Division.
What’s wrong with playing the piano?” – Maestro

Milch’s excellent scheme drives the episode towards one of the most famed segments in which Chiaki performs Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, a piece which is both complex and emotionally exhausting.

Nodame 05

Strezemann’s goal is to bring about a heightened state of emotion in Chiaki to which the feelings of loss and longing will be most apparent. Rach’s concerto requires such a great amount passion of the spirit and for the moment. Milch burns the idea of expression into Chiaki with hopes that he will emanate a lavish interpretation of the music.

“Use your whole body more to express music!”
“But I’m not that type of person…”

Chiaki continually practices, reflecting on the instruction and searching to understand Milch’s desire. And we see glimpses where Chiaki may not break free of his own mechanics.

Nodame 05

The timeliness of Milch’s words before the concert are what ultimately transform Chiaki as he is informed that the concert will be their final act together. Chiaki did not realize what he had been prepared for: the performance, sentiment, and passionate feeling for the present. But he appreciates the music and approaches it honestly. The future nostalgia is in the distance, but it’s realized how this event will be a memory for all time.

“I don’t like the fact, that it will be over soon…”

The Tin Woodman finds his heart. It is a crucial step for Chiaki in becoming a more robust person, accompanied by fantastic music. Milch proves to be more than a maestro of music, conducting not only the orchestra but also the emotive forces within Chiaki. It’s such a great episode.

Afterthoughts

Nodame staring up at the moon after Chiaki’s performance also carries a natural symbolism. Watching from afar but not yet reaching for the moon. She also holds Milch’s pocket watch, and there is a sense that she needs to act before time ticks away. Nodame’s conflict is beginning, Kiyora and Mine’s gears are turning. Meanwhile, Sakura looks completely adorable in that pink hair bow.

Rachmaninoff’s 2nd is a truly beautiful and mesmerizing piece in full glory. I believe the drama-cut took a majority from the Moderato movement and finsihed with Allegro while removing Adagio completely. I have always found the second movement, Adagio sostenuto, the most romantic and painful of the three due to the closing melody’s low-strung dissonance. I highly recommend listening to the movement with Chiaki and Milch in mind to better understand the breadth of emotion these characters were dealing with.

Bonus: Milch Expression Session Swatch

Milch

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how he and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of trivial disarray in Hibito’s approach to life. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each involuntary sub-action works against the meticulous. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes his success look easy in taking initiative towards larger steps, grouping minuscule details into intuitive motion. Satori, perhaps.

But Mutta can reach Hibito with his small-step approach. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… I enjoyed the episode. That is all.

Categories: Spring.

Tags:

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how he and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of trivial disarray in Hibito’s approach to life. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each involuntary sub-action works against the meticulous. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes his success look easy in taking initiative towards larger steps, grouping minuscule details into intuitive motion. Satori, perhaps.

But Mutta can reach Hibito with his small-step approach. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… I enjoyed the episode. That is all.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how he and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of trivial disarray in Hibito’s approach to life. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each involuntary sub-action works against the meticulous. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes his success look easy in taking initiative towards larger steps, grouping minuscule details into intuitive motion. Satori, perhaps.

But Mutta can reach Hibito with his small-step approach. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… I enjoyed the episode. That is all.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how he and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of trivial disarray in Hibito’s approach to life. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each involuntary sub-action works against the meticulous. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes his success look easy in taking initiative towards larger steps, grouping minuscule details into intuitive motion. Satori, perhaps.

But Mutta can reach Hibito with his small-step approach. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode for a brother.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how he and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of trivial disarray in Hibito’s approach to life. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each involuntary sub-action works against the meticulous. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes his success look easy in taking initiative towards larger steps, grouping minuscule details into intuitive motion. Satori, perhaps.

But Mutta can reach Hibito with his small-step approach. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode for a brother like me.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps and groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Mutta can reach Hibito with an approach that requires finer steps to get there. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps and groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Mutta can reach Hibito with an approach that requires finer steps to get there. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps and groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Mutta can reach Hibito with an approach that requires finer steps to get there. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps and groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Mutta can reach Hibito with an approach that requires finer steps to get there. And we return to “one small step for man (Mutta), one giant leap (Hibito)…” I could go on, but… this was a fun episode.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps and groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Mutta can reach Hibito, his approach requires finer steps to get there. “One small

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal, steer. And here is where enumerating each unconscious sub-action fails. If we think about every necessary motion, we will tire or fail. Hibito makes it look easy because takes initiative towards larger steps or groups the minuscule details into an intuitive motion.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture. The presence of bicycles this episode struck me because I feel “riding a bike” is a great point of comparison between the characters.

For those who ride bikes regularly [without falling into a river] the process is perhaps too simple for conscious decomposition into smaller movements. We feel the action as one or two units: pedal and steer.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which may limit his perspective of the big picture.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile a method to the mayhem which

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile order

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Though beyond the identification, I feel Hibito’s lack of perfection, his chaos, is relatively perfect. Whereas I think Mutta’s meticulous and seemingly exhaustive approach is exactly why he fails; a failed perfectionist. Mutta sees each piece of the machine and attempts to reconcile order

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself was the sibling awareness. My younger brother and I are similar to the point that we see each other’s “chaos” when we visit and observe our places.

Categories: .

Space Brothers: Imperfection

Space Brothers 05

Unlike last episode, I have a few thoughts on the presence of Hibito and how him and Mutta are mutually revealing in many ways. Hibito is and isn’t what I expected, mostly because of how well Mutta understands his younger sibling. While the overall message of episode 5 may have been that everyone is “missing something” or incomplete, I felt more compelled by the brothers’ interaction with one another.

Presumably, Mutta and Hibito have not met in some time, though there is no issue of it as Mutta knows Hibito almost as well as he knows himself. Mutta points out the hints of disarray in Hibito’s approach to life, a somewhat trivial. What was obviously amusing for myself

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate ideas through comment relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

PBV=potency by volume. Subscribers and posts per-week are based on Google Reader statistics.

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate ideas through comment relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

PBV=potency by volume. Subscribers and posts per-week are based on Google Reader statistics.

Categories: Review.

Tags:

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate ideas through comment relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

PBV=potency by volume. Subscribers and posts per-week are based on Google Reader statistics.

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate ideas through comment relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

PBV=potency by volume. Subscribers and posts per-week are based on Google Reader statistics.

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate ideas through comment relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

PBV=potency by volume. Subscribers and posts per-week are generated from G

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but regular readers will adjust. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD where it feels impossible to penetrate the  in-comment with relevancy. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Ass-Kickingly Strong
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
PBV: Strong, will kick your ass
Subscribers: 300-500
Posts Per-week: 2-3
Read Now: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]
Read Later: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

Site: http://www.pelleas.net/aniTOP
Recommended R: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei [link]
Contemporary Reading: Lupin III: Fujiko [link]

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

What to read: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei archive.

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews: AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

What to read: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei archive.

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews

a beautiful world

AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

What to read: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei archive.

Chikorita157′s Anime Blog

Toxic Muffin

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews

a beautiful world

AniPages Daily

Anipages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

What to read: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei archive.

Chikorita157′s Anime Blog

Toxic Muffin

Categories: .

2012 Blog Reviews

a beautiful world

AniPages Daily

Ben’s edifice and his insight into anime production is brilliant. He stands alone with an intimidating amount of technical knowledge that really isn’t found elsewhere among anime blogs. In turn, APD offers a unique perspective on subjects that indirectly relate to many fans. I value the blog, though I do not consider it casual reading. The blog is functional just as the content is meaningful without being dressed up in artsy prose. Posts are sometimes massive, thick with the names of directors and animators, projects, and implicit timelines. This is easily a turnoff for the average reader of anime blogs, as the many posts are borderline inaccessible. I’m not kidding when I say it takes effort to thoroughly digest many of these posts, but it’s something regular readers adjust to. Discussions tend to be another issue on APD, where it seems impossible to penetrate with a comment in any relevant way. And when discussion takes hold, there may be depth requirements many anime fans lack altogether.

What to read: Yojouhan Shinwa Taikei archive.

Chikorita157′s Anime Blog

Toxic Muffin

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons.

xxxholic logo

Leave it to CLAMP to evoke the aesthetic of Victorian iron fencing in type. I am showing only a vector for example as the xxxHolic type is distinct for structure and pointed trimmings more than coloring. The thought of iron fencing is curious, perhaps as a boundary to Yuuko’s shop. But the type also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from a pipe, almost cryptic.

Both aspects feel valid and contrast Yuuko’s presence and the atmosphere of her shop. The type is far more mysterious than welcoming but holds true to the dark and guarded story. And I believe the logo perfectly captures the essence of xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Afterthoughts

I have little to say about this exercise, other than it was very enjoyable (a bit tedious between a busy Friday and lazy Saturday). I’d love to read or hear about other logos fans find interesting and why.

Categories: Meditation.

Tags: , , , , ,

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons.

xxxholic logo

Leave it to CLAMP to evoke the aesthetic of Victorian iron fencing in type. I am showing only a vector for example as the xxxHolic type is distinct for structure and pointed trimmings more than coloring. The thought of iron fencing is curious, perhaps as a boundary to Yuuko’s shop. But the type also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from a pipe, almost cryptic.

Both aspects feel valid and contrast Yuuko’s presence and the atmosphere of her shop. The type is far more mysterious than welcoming but holds true to the dark and guarded story. And I believe the logo perfectly captures the essence of xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Afterthoughts

I have little to say about this exercise, other than it was very enjoyable (a bit tedious between a busy Friday and lazy Saturday). I’d love to read or hear about other logos fans find interesting and why.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons.

xxxholic logo

Leave it to CLAMP to evoke the aesthetic of Victorian iron fencing in type. I am showing only a vector for example as the xxxHolic type is distinct for structure and pointed trimmings more than coloring. The thought of iron fencing is curious, perhaps as a boundary to Yuuko’s shop. But the type also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from a pipe, almost cryptic.

Both aspects feel valid and contrast Yuuko’s presence and the atmosphere of her shop. The type is far more mysterious than welcoming but holds true to the dark and guarded story. And I believe the logo perfectly captures the essence of xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Afterthoughts

I have little to say about this exercise, other than it was very enjoyable (a bit tedious between a busy Friday and lazy Saturday). I’d love to read or hear about oth

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons.

xxxholic logo

Leave it to CLAMP to evoke the aesthetic of Victorian iron fencing in type. I am showing only a vector for example as the xxxHolic type is distinct for structure and pointed trimmings more than coloring. The thought of iron fencing is curious, perhaps as a boundary to Yuuko’s shop. But the type also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from a pipe, almost cryptic.

Both aspects feel valid and contrast Yuuko’s presence and the atmosphere of her shop. The type is far more mysterious than welcoming but holds true to the dark and guarded story. And I believe the logo perfectly captures the essence of xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons.

xxxholic logo

Leave it to CLAMP to evoke the aesthetic of Victorian iron fencing in type. I am showing only a vector for example as the xxxHolic type is distinct for the pointed trimmings more than coloring. The thought of iron fencing is curious, perhaps as a boundary to Yuuko’s shop. But the type also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe.

Both aspects feel valid and capture the Yuuko’s presence and the atmosphere of her shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons. It’s a rad logo all-around.

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. In some way the calligraphy resembles a postmark. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhances asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons. All-around, this is a rad logo.

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo kicks ass, that’s about it. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have no method of tying it into the story. But it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing. A square grey diamond, set on white, marked in black. While not a minimal approach, the strict palette lends to a visual simplicity I admire. And the diamond enhance asymmetry in the design.

What’s fascinating about this is how the calligraphy offsets the lower symmetry and maintains balance from left to right. Tracing the strokes in 喰 and 霊, there is a sense of strength and movement in the kanji and I feel a similarity between this calligraphic overlay and postmarks. My knowledge of Japanese calligraphy artists is limited, but Heart by Kasumi Bunsho is similarly attractive for these reasons. All-around, this is a rad logo

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei – Zero logo simply kicks ass. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories .

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird can symbolize Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and icon of Tsukishima’s cafe, a family introduced in the first episode of Cross Game. The family consists of four daughters and a their widowed father, each daughter signifying one leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the first episode, hence the single faded leaf. This event triggers emotional momentum and tension that persists until the story’s conclusion.

The clover appears throughout as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. This is the inescapable sentiment about Wakaba and what attracts me to the logo. One glance at the clover and I understand there are as many complexities as irreplaceable memories for the characters.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird is a symbol of Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. Holding hands is a timeless act. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird is a symbol of Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like that these features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is a necessary enhancement. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I rarely express my opinion of the series but admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe because it divulges greater details into the karma and ancient magic driving the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides gratuitous whitespace between characters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, which is indiscriminately a crow. The bird is a symbol of Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu, feathers on the wind. I like these componentsThese features capture the story in one succinct image.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am mainly attracted to the soft palette and accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is nifty and necessary. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. The minimalism is effective, and I love that.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained in the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am attracted to the softness and flower accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is nifty and necessary. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while lending a touch of youth; blossoming, feelings anew. And I love the minimalism for being pleasing and effective.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

This logo is an immediate favorite. Akira explained in the elegance of type in Aoi Hana‘s logo, while I am attracted to the softness and flower accessory. Its specific hue appears darker in contrast with a white background but yields a sensitivity unlike other series with watercolor appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout Aoi Hana‘s 11 episodes. I feel it leaves an impression comparable to that of Fumi’s character and her emotional struggle.

A little blue flower to accessorize the type is nifty and necessary. With ‘Sweet Blue Flowers’ in title, the accent has a natural fit while giving the type a touch of youth. Flowers, blossoming, and feeling anew. I e

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered which logos were distinguished among the anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive, enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

Akirascuro explained in further detail about the elegance of the type, and I am drawn to the lightness and flower accessory. The specific hue of the type appears darker in contrast with a white background, but the pastel yields a sensitivity unlike many other series with watercolour appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout the series. And the flower is something I find nifty.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered what logos have stood among the various anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive and enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

Akirascuro explained in further detail about the elegance of the type, and I am drawn to the lightness and flower accessory. The specific hue of the type appears darker in contrast with a white background, but the pastel yields a sensitivity unlike many other series with watercolour appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout the series. And the flower is something I find nifty.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find appealing.

Categories: .

The Logo Treatment

In subscribing to Akirascuro‘s inspiration of logotypes, I pondered what logos have stood among the various anime I’ve encountered. I found a handful of logos personally attractive and enough to further detail in a post. While Akira seems to focus on the typographic attributes of logos, I am drawn to the way logos are accessorized and capture their respective stories.

xxxHolic

xxxholic logo

Aesthetic similar to that of Victorian iron fencing, but also carries the elusive movement of smoke rising from Yuuko’s pipe. Most of the essence I believe carries with it the presence or atmosphere of Yuuko’s shop. This is a logo that captures the dark essence of the xxxHolic to a recognizable extent.

Aoi Hana

aoi hana logo

Akirascuro explained in further detail about the elegance of the type, and I am drawn to the lightness and flower accessory. The specific hue of the type appears darker in contrast with a white background, but the pastel yields a sensitivity unlike many other series with watercolour appeal. The light blue sensation, both gentle and inviting, is felt throughout the series. And the flower is something I find nifty.

Air

air logo

As a Kyoto Animation – Key project, Air is likely a divisive anime for many fans. I have never expressed my opinion of the series here, and admit Air to be one of the more agreeable stories in the Key universe as there is a more prominent fantasy basis in the storyline in that the audience is given greater details into the karma and ancient magic which drives the story. This logo is attractive for a few reasons.

The streamlined type with embossed shine is minimal and provides a healthy amount of whitespace surrounding the letters. It uniquely features a silhouette holding hands, presumably tragic character of Misuzu Kamio. I don’t believe many logos feature the romantic gesture, but hand-holding melts me like butter on a warm muffin. It’s timeless. Finally is the bird in the distance, although it looks like a gull instead of a blackbird or crow, I believe it is a basic symbol for Yukito’s fate as well as the tragic cycle which binds Misuzu. Together, these features signify important points in the story.

Cross Game

cross game logo

While the typography and colors are fairly plain, the strength of Cross Game‘s logo is the clover. Clover is the name and image of Tsukishima’s cafe. And the Tsukishimas are a family introduced in the first episode; four daughters and a their widowed father, with the each daughter signifying a leave of the clover. Wakaba Tsukishima, the second daughter and childhood love interest of Ko, tragically loses her life in the episode, an event which trigger emotional momentum and tension that echoes until the series conclusion.

The clover remains as we get to know Ko, the Tsukishimas, and other characters connected to Wakaba. We’re continually reminded of the girls and especially Wakaba by her faded leaf. This is the sentiment attracting me to the logo, where I can glance at the clover and know there are many complexities behind it as well as the characters’ irreplaceable memories.

Ga-Rei Zero

ga rei zero logo

The Ga-Rei -Zero- logo is plain sick. Because the main draw is calligraphy, I have difficulty tying it into the story, but it’s the style and aesthetic tightness which I find